We carry tablecloths in many sizes, but do we have a tablecloth big enough for your table? Yes! Click the dachshund above to read complete details on our website. Long story short (no pun intended), we have lengths up to 132″ (11 feet) in stock for immediate shipment, or we can custom-order a tablecloth for your unique table in the French pattern of your choice. Whether you need a tablecloth that is longer or wider than usual, we have solutions that work and look good.

If you need an oversized tablecloth, please give us a call at 888-96-FRANCE or send us an email and we will let you know what the options are. Please keep in mind that special orders will take about 30 days to ship.

Get ready for the holidays with a tablecloth that is just right for your table!

La Lavande was launched in 1986 from one family’s desire to bring the finest French soaps to the United States. While teaching music in France, they were inspired by the variety and quality of scented soaps available. La Lavande provides pure vegetable hard-milled soaps following the time-honored tradition of French soap making, beneficial for all skin types, especially dry or sensitive skin. Natural and pure, these soaps contain no petroleum or animal products.

Click any of the pictures below to view more information and purchase
on I Dream of France.

Curved Soaps

Available in four delicious scents, the extra mild high quality La Lavande French curved soap bar fits conveniently in the palm of your hand. This triple-milled, all-vegetable soap is enriched with sweet almond oil.

Pair one or two with a wash mitt for an easy, thoughtful gift.

French triple milled curved scented soaps

Heart Soaps in Eiffel Tower Gift Boxes

Perfect for your Valentine any time of the year, this heart shaped soap from La Lavande is available in Tea Rose, Lemongrass, French Tulip & Lavender. Sold in kraft gift box with Eiffel Tower label.Coucke Coquelicots (Poppies) French Dish Towel - Big Design

Sachets, Large and Small

These sachets come from the small town of Brette in the south of France and contain genuine dried French lavender. The sachet is made of Provencal fabric and is beautifully crafted.
French lavender sachets

Essential Oils and Diffusers

These handpainted ceramic diffusers come in four different designs. Fill with Lavender, Lemongrass, or Rose Geranium essential oils (sold separately).

French handpainted ceramic oil diffusers

We are so excited about this colorful new collection from France and thrilled to share pictures with you! These table and home items are fun, easy additions for your home, and make charming gifts as well. Click any of the photos to view more information on I Dream of France.

As always, ground shipping is free for orders of $75 or more! No coupon code required. For faster shipping, or for destinations outside the USA and Canada, please inquire for shipping charges at 1-888-96-FRANCE or bonjour@idreamoffrance.com.

Paris Ceramic Mug

This fun ceramic mug will let you escape to the City of Lights any time you are having coffee or tea!

Paris Ceramic Mug

 

Paris Tall Glass

This fun drinking glass is five inches tall and ready for your favorite drink.
Paris Tall Glass

 

Paris Melamine Lunch/Dessert Plate

Eight inch lunch/dessert plate is a smaller size for casual dining and made of melamine for easy care and durability.
Paris Melamine Lunch/Dessert Plate

 

Paris Ceramic Salt and Pepper Shakers Set

This adorable set is perfect for your table, and comes in a beautiful box for gift-giving. (Our tip: buy two!) Sel means salt, and poivre means pepper.

Paris Ceramic Salt and Pepper Shakers Set

Paris Coconut Fiber Doormat

Everyone who comes to your door will know your heart belongs in Paris.
Paris Coconut Fiber Doormat

 

Halloween is coming! Looking for some new ways to decorate a pumpkin? Here are some fresh ideas we discovered this year.

Toile Pumpkin -- Photo by Miki Duisterhof for Country Living Magazine

Toile Pumpkin -- Photo by Miki Duisterhof for Country Living Magazine

First, how about a French Country toile pumpkin? Click the photo for a link to Country Living Magazine’s article on how to decoupage an artifical pumpkin. I would make this in  black and white toile and display it with smaller pumpkins covered in black and white checks.

Monogram Thumbtack Pumpkin -- All in a Day Blog

Monogram Thumbtack Pumpkin -- All in a Day Blog

Next: a nickel-colored pumpkin with your own monogram! Click the photo to go to the All in a Day blog and see how Amy made this. I haven’t seen a pumpkin like this before, and I think it’s unique, charming, and lovely. Another stylish colorway would be a black pumpkin with brass thumbtacks.(I discovered this pumpkin via Pinterest — if you haven’t heard of this site before, check it out!)

Terra Cotta Jack O'Lanterns -- Shabby Chic Shar Blog

Terra Cotta Jack O'Lanterns -- Shabby Chic Shar Blog

A friend of mine collects terra cotta jack o’ lanterns from the flea market. She has several sizes with varying faces. The lid (or hat) of each pumpkin comes off so you can put a votive candle inside. I found this photo of a similar collection from the Shabby Chic Shar Blog.

Halloween Light-Up Pumpkin by Day

Halloween Light-Up Pumpkin by Day

Halloween Light-Up Pumpkin by Night

Halloween Light-Up Pumpkin by Night

Here is a light-up electrical pumpkin I found at a discount store. It is made of a metal frame covered with a thin layer of woven fibers, sequins, and a felt leaf and stem. Under the frame are light bulbs. The lighted effect is a pleasant anticipation of Christmas lights…only a month or so away!

Coucke Citrouille (Pumpkin) Dish Towel from I Dream of France

Coucke Citrouille (Pumpkin) Dish Towel from I Dream of France

And last but not least…a French pumpkin kitchen towel! This design is super popular in our shop, and people love the grommet in the corner for hanging. The cheerful mix of colors make this towel pretty year-round. No need to pack it up after jack o’ lantern season is over.

Hope you feel inspired to try something new this year, and Happy Halloween!

–Brett

AkzoNobel’s Aesthetic Center has just published its Colour Futures 2011 guide. The dominant trend they predict is Appreciation, a refreshing concept, non? As they say, “This concept is packed with what we hold most dear and truthful — a home base that is simple and informal and rooted in the here and now.” The color they suggest to represent this trend is what they call Lime Twist, shown as the lower wall color in the photo below.

Lime Twist courtesy of colourfutures.com

Lime Twist courtesy of colourfutures.com

One might also call this spring green, lemongrass, or a mellow chartreuse. In my opinion it is warmer than pistachio. It’s not exactly wasabi, either, but if you want to call it that, I won’t argue.

I happen to love this color and think it mixes harmoniously with many other colors, such as the grey as shown in the photo. I would also put it with many shades of blue and brown, and think it would really shine with hot shades of pink or orange. Lavender would be a soothing mate.

Here are some products from I Dream of France that feature Lime Twist:

La Lavande Tilleul Soap at I Dream of France

La Lavande Tilleul Soap at I Dream of France

Bougies la Francaise Candlesticks from I Dream of France

Bougies la Francaise Candlesticks from I Dream of France

Beauville Orchids Linen Tea Towel from I Dream of France

Beauville Orchids Linen Tea Towel from I Dream of France

Merci to the fabulous Ellen Kennon who wrote about this report on Twitter and her blog!

— Brett

The September 2009 issue of Architectural Digest has an amazing article and photo spread of a chateau in the Loire Valley in France that was recently purchased and renovated by an American. Built in the 1760s with 26 acres of formal gardens, the building had been used to hide paintings from the Louvre during WW2, as well as a hospital for the British during that war. It had been owned by the French government ever since, and contained no kitchen or bathroom when the American bought it. What is interesting is not just the jaw-dropping photos of historical splendor, but the details of restoring such a monument. (If you think historical committees are tough here in the States, they are soft in comparison.) For one thing, the new owner is not allowed to alter any walls, which meant that when he put in a kitchen, it was attached to new walls that stood in front of the original walls. The local board also made him replace some fruit trees he planted, because they were not of a type that existed in 1760. They are wise to be so strict, though, because a place this old and storied is a treasure, and once you lose part of it, you can’t really get it back.

Jean-Michel told me that in Poitiers, where he is from, during the 1960s the fashion was to tear down old stone buildings if they were in the way of a proposed development, or to stucco over them to make them look modern. Today people are painstakingly removing the stucco to try to get back the old stonework. When I think about how excited people get over 1950s pastel bath fixtures here in the States, or old light fixtures (we have some Deco-period hanging lights in our home)–just imagine living with Roman aquaducts in town! Some people complain about how America (in particular, the west coast) has so little history compared to Europe–well, we’ll never get there if we keep tearing things down.