AkzoNobel’s Aesthetic Center has just published its Colour Futures 2011 guide. The dominant trend they predict is Appreciation, a refreshing concept, non? As they say, “This concept is packed with what we hold most dear and truthful — a home base that is simple and informal and rooted in the here and now.” The color they suggest to represent this trend is what they call Lime Twist, shown as the lower wall color in the photo below.

Lime Twist courtesy of colourfutures.com

Lime Twist courtesy of colourfutures.com

One might also call this spring green, lemongrass, or a mellow chartreuse. In my opinion it is warmer than pistachio. It’s not exactly wasabi, either, but if you want to call it that, I won’t argue.

I happen to love this color and think it mixes harmoniously with many other colors, such as the grey as shown in the photo. I would also put it with many shades of blue and brown, and think it would really shine with hot shades of pink or orange. Lavender would be a soothing mate.

Here are some products from I Dream of France that feature Lime Twist:

La Lavande Tilleul Soap at I Dream of France

La Lavande Tilleul Soap at I Dream of France

Bougies la Francaise Candlesticks from I Dream of France

Bougies la Francaise Candlesticks from I Dream of France

Beauville Orchids Linen Tea Towel from I Dream of France

Beauville Orchids Linen Tea Towel from I Dream of France

Merci to the fabulous Ellen Kennon who wrote about this report on Twitter and her blog!

— Brett

Advertisements

Philippe Deshoulières Canapé Plates

This French city of Limoges would probably remain unknown to the world if it were not for the amazing porcelain it produces. Located in the central region of Limousin, the city of Limoges has a very rich history dating back to the Roman empire. Remains of a Roman amphitheater as well as many edifices from the middle ages and renaissance make Limoges an interesting destination for anybody interested in history.

However, what sets Limoges apart from other historical cities in France is its porcelain industry. A few decades before the French Revolution, supplies of kaolin clay were found near Limoges. The exact type of kaolin made it possible to produce fine porcelain to compete with the popular pieces made in China at the time. The Limoges porcelain was delicate and very white, almost translucent, making it extremely desirable.  First commissioned by the king Louis XVI, the manufacture of Limoges porcelain gave birth to various companies after the revolution. Names include Bernardaud, Raynaud, Haviland or Philippe Deshoulières.

The Deshoulières group (headquartered near my hometown of Poitiers) is one of the most renowned porcelain manufacturer since it opened in 1826 and is famous for its contemporary designs. We chose a beautiful, yet very affordable, line of canapé plates to carry in our collection. The canapé plates are six inches in diameter, perfect for dessert, salad or hors d’oeuvres served around the couch (canapé means couch in French). They come in a beautiful lavender gift box, are dishwasher safe and adorn the genuine “Porcelaine de Limoges” stamp. Each has a theme, French Castles, Wine and Cheese, Merchant Row, St Tropez Beaches, Herbs, and Walk in Provence. They make a very thoughtful gift and they are the perfect way to treat yourself to the real Limoges at a very affordable price.

Until the end of August, all our Deshoulières sets are 10% off! Use coupon code LIMOGES in the shopping cart or stop by our boutique in Tustin.

— Jean-Michel

P.S. Read about our trip to Limoges and the porcelain factory tour we took!